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Moving Air

Mark Lockheart

Digital format — Album / Tracks

Moving Air

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also feat.
Mark Lockheart (reeds), John Parricelli (guitar), Dudley Phillips (bass), Martin France (drums)
released
2005
Label
Basho Records
Catalogue no.
SRCD14-2

Moving Air is a new studio album from acclaimed saxophonist and composer Mark Lockheart and is his first solo album for three years. Moving Air is a fascinating and passionate statement featuring Mark’s saxophone and bass clarinet playing in a number of instrumental combinations and textures, from a clarinet and drum duet to a jazz quartet and even a sax quintet. Mark’s carefully crafted compositions become vehicles for each musician’s improvisations, always keeping the music fresh and spontaneous. The compositions explore improvisation, texture and grooves and although coming from jazz, the music draws upon a wide range of influences including contemporary classical, folk and world. One critic recently described Mark’s music as:

“a beautiful type of orchestral world jazz”.

On Moving Air, Mark plays all the reeds and is joined by drum supremo Martin France, guitarist John Parricelli and bassist Dudley Phillips.

Reviews

Jazzwise

Featuring four exceptional musicians, some really strong tunes and equally classy arrangements, this deserves to do well. What's more it actually dares to be different from the pack. There's almost a chamber jazz quality to some of these pieces. 'Man In The Moon' is a lovely , lilting, dancing piece. In turn , electronics add layers of weird sounds to 'Strange Remark' . Parricelli provides the perfect foil for the leader here and throughout, while France's use of of electronic percussion alongside kit drums is just what these tunes require. Whether its the gentle ballad-like quality of 'Ship To Shore', the powerful 'Dreamland' or the glacial beauty of 'Light Years' , Lockheart can be truly proud of this album"

John Bungey, The Times

Lockheart, one of Polar Bear's saxophonists , is a mainstay of the younger British scene, graduating through Loose Tubes and Perfect Houseplants. His restless, multilayered music is closer to the mainstream than Polar Bear's- more concert hall than club. Like Django Bate's output , his open-hearted tunes reflect wide listening- folkish themes, contemporary classical and drum' n'bass percussion all tussle for space. The nine varied pieces have an aura of spontaneity and inventiveness that comes, you suspect, only from careful design

John Lewis, Time Out

Ex- Loose Tuber and Polar Bear member Mark Lockheart's Moving Air is a multi-layered work that sets his sax and haunting bass clarinet against gentle electronics, multi tracked horns and beautifully textured contemporary tunes, and with John Parricelli and Martin France on board reminds us that the influence of Loose Tubes lives on

John Kelman, AllAboutJazz

The most remarkable thing about Moving Air is Lockheart's ability to make the multitracking process feel organic. On three of the album's nine tracks, he layers saxophones, clarinet, and keyboards, with only Martin France accompanying,and yet everything sounds and feels vivid and alive. Elsewhere, odd meters and displaced rhythms abound, blended with themes that seamlessly shift between unison and counterpoint, creating richly detailed backdrops that paradoxically encourage, rather than impede, imaginative improvisation. Were Lockheart living in New York , he'd likely be a part of the circle that includes David Binney, saxophonist Chris Potter , guitarist Adam Rogers, and bassist Scott Colley. That's recommendation enough for jazz fans outside the UK to step beyond their own defined circles and check out a player as contemporary and significant as any of his American counterparts

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