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Seventh Sense

Tim Lapthorn

Digital format — Album / Tracks

Seventh Sense

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also feat.
Tim Lapthorn, Arnie Somgyi, Stephen Keogh
released
2007
Label
Basho Records
Catalogue no.
SRCD19-2

In the wake of his successful album “Natural Language” (Basho Records SRCD 9-2) Tim returns with a sparkling set of material featuring Arnie Somogyi (bass) and Stephen Keogh (drums). Seventh Sense puts the emphasis squarely back on the art of heartfelt improvisation and storytelling. The idea of the recording was to approach a number of new unrehearsed tunes with a clean slate and to see what happened. Most the tracks are first takes and there is virtually no editing, giving the music a very natural joyous feeling.

Reviews

John Fordham. The Guardian

Tim Lapthorn is a young UK pianist who is very much absorbed in standards, and the 40-year-old piano trio legacy of the late Bill Evans. How much he favours the Evans trio's conversational approach is firmly declared in the opening account of Thelonious Monk's clangy Bright Mississippi, which becomes a conversation between all three members (Arnie Somogyi is the bassist, Stephen Keogh the drummer) almost as soon as the theme appears. Lapthorn has the long-line vision of the best improvisers, which he often sustains within pieces that have contrastingly fragmented rhythmic identities, and he uses references to familiar jazz-piano licks sparingly. Three out of the nine tracks are his own, with the quiet title track having a little of Brad Mehldau's inclination to develop slowly-blooming melodic possibilities from a simple vamp-like start. The Bark and the Bite merges a contemporary rhythmic feel, a classic-bop melody and a long, uptempo improvisation against Keogh's cymbal beat and Somogyi's emphatic walk. Lapthorn's touch, flow and fresh ideas suggest a lot of music to come, and in all probability it won't always be as close to the tradition as this is.

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